Previous Missions and Visions of the Transport Association

"We are not the Transport Association, if you are a member click here"

Mission

To promote the qualities and values of medium-sized transport and distribution companies to both potential and existing customers.

Vision

The Transport Association believes that there is a key role to be played by medium-sized transport and distribution companies co-operating to meet the requirements of customers across all sectors in a fast changing business environment.

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About Information About the History and Current Services of the Transport Association

Previous Missions and Visions of the Transport Association

"We are not the Transport Association, if you are a member click here"

Mission

To promote the qualities and values of medium-sized transport and distribution companies to both potential and existing customers.

Vision

The Transport Association believes that there is a key role to be played by medium-sized transport and distribution companies co-operating to meet the requirements of customers across all sectors in a fast changing business environment.

History and Current Services of the Transport Associations

Truck and load security takes priority with the Transport Association

The issue of truck and load security was top of the agenda when Transport Association members put Martin Jones, head of the Freight and Logistics Division of the Department for Transport, under the spotlight.

Speaking at a Transport Association meeting in London recently, Mr Jones outlined the work of the Road Haulage Modernisation Fund (RHMF) and the areas of training, enforcement, fuel economy and more environmentally acceptable vehicles that had been addressed by the fund. He said it was the Government's intention that the RHMF should be "demand" led and not a subsidy to the industry.

Transport Association members hit back by identifying that a national network of secure lorry parks with good facilities for drivers is what is needed. This would help the environment by removing lorries from lay-bys and unsuitable urban areas while also promoting the Road Haulage Modernisation Fund's objective of attracting new people into the industry by providing quality safe and secure facilities for overnight stops.

"Fewer and fewer places are willing to accept lorries for overnight stops," says Ken Devereux, a member of the Transport Association's RHMF working party. "By law all drivers have to take a break so it these facilities that should be provided, or at least supported, by the Government".

"It is scandalous that 50m of the fund will not have been spent by the end of March 2004 when the scheme comes to an end," added Stephen Taylor, managing director of Taylors of Martley.

William Vickers chairman of the Transport Association added that tangible evidence of the use of the Fund would be for the money to go to set up a centralised communications centre where police forces throughout the UK could share information and provide a seamless service in the area of lorry and load thefts. This would have a clear benefit to the industry and could also help reduce insurance premiums for operators.

Mr Jones stressed that the Fund would end in March, but assured Transport Association members that he had heard and understood their concerns and that he would take their suggestions about vehicle and load safety and security back to the Department for Transport. He added that the issue of parking areas was one that could be addressed at regional and local level, and he encouraged the Association to ensure their concerns were heard by those developing regional and local plans.

The Transport Association was founded more than 50 years ago as a self-help group of around 65 hauliers, mainly family-owned businesses, who provide operational support for each other across the UK, as well as services including fuel, vehicle repair and maintenance, overnight parking and temporary storage for a network of over 4,000 vehicles and 150 depots throughout England, Scotland and Wales.